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Found 111 results

  1. Hey Guys and Gals!, Here today to ask if it's possible to use a JTAG HDD on a normal Xbox. My JTAG had RROD ETC and broke, want to use the HDD though. Thanks, Sokka
  2. ok i've just read through the checklist and read about the gamertags why can't we use gamertags with spaces in anymore? it used to work for me and now i cannot use my live account on LiNK, i don't see how this should be a problem as this works with other programs and older updates from yous, also why has it now suddenly broken since this update? will you's also be fixing it any time soon or something i can do that doesn't involve me changing gamertag/account or using xlinkai / xbs thanks.
  3. Asfand353

    Voice chat BO2

    When I play on LINK the player are having voice chat,do the xbox live headphones work with system link to chat?
  4. Hello everyone, i got a Question. How can I host or join a Systemlink game of an original Xbox because there is no Systemlink option when i press the Guide button. Thanks for any Help in advance.
  5. I've recently RGH'ed my Trinity XBox360 4GB console with 250GB external HDD. I am able to play GOD games in FSD (I use F3), but two black bars come on top and bottom of my TV (It's a really old 21" CRT TV ....which my parents won't allow me to change for a HDTV ). So, plz tell me if there is any way to get FSD working in fullscreen (like the DASHBOARD!). And if not possible, can I run GOD games from external HDD in the XBox360 DASHBOARD?? Plz Help.....(nd I have already googled and searched the entire forum with only 1 common thread....that too was very unclear and was unable to help me....so plz Help) Thanks, AdilDSW.
  6. Hello, I have recently been playing on LiNK and noticed that not all the lobbies which are available through this page: http://link.jqe360.com/ are visible on my Xbox. I can see the lobbies, but it says there are zero players. When I change my Xbox's selected lobby to those lobbies from my PC or Xbox I still am unable to see anyone else. Is the page just a little buggy or am I unable to play in those lobbies? Thanks for all your time! John
  7. The Xbox 360 is the best console you can buy. Except it's inexplicably missing something the Wii and PS3 have: Wi-Fi. You could buy Microsoft's $90 dongle. Or you could follow this guide. The Xbox 360's lack of Wi-Fi is a totally killer hardware flaw�if you're not right on top of your router, you've either gotta string miles of ethernet cable or buy that pricey ass dongle from Microsoft. Unless you check out one of the cheaper alternatives. Here's every major way to get your Xbox going on Wi-Fi, sorted by easiest to hardest (but most satisfying). Donglage Dongles are, by far, the easiest way to get your Xbox 360 on a wireless network. But they also tend to be the priciest. # Microsoft's official wireless adapter is $87, which is absolute horseshit for a Wi-Fi antenna attached to a USB cable. But it looks the nicest and is super easy to use�just plug and play. Update: This weekend you can get one for $69. # The next stop is a third-party wireless adapter, where you've got your pick from Linksys ($65), Belkin ($70) and hey, Linksys ($90, but it's 802.11n). Same deal, plug and play. # Finally, your cheapest option is from...Microsoft. Turns out, a regular Xbox wireless adapter (which is a supercheap $50), works just fine, with a tiny bit of finagling: Don't put in its actual install CD. Just plug it in, and set your encryption. It might take two tries to get it to work, but it will. And, it won't eat up a USB port like the official Xbox 360 one. Spoiler alert: This is our pick for best option, based on its combo of cheapness and convenience, if you can find one. Share Your Computer's Connection Sharing your computer's connection is the cheapest option�it's actually the freest one. It'll work with a laptop or desktop, though a laptop is more truly wireless�the desktop bit is an option if your router's just a step too far out of the way. Basically, you're plugging your Xbox into the computer's ethernet port, and then having it use your computer's wireless connection to connect to the internet. Windows It's actually harder to reliably share the internet love on Windows with its cousin, the Xbox 360, than it is on a Mac: No method worked reliably for us across multiple Windows computers. But here's how it should work: 1. Share your computer's wireless connection. Microsoft actually details the process here, and it's pretty easy. From the Network and Sharing center, click on the manage network connections option on the left. From there, right click on the connect you wanna share (probably wireless, unless you're daisy-chaining 'cause your box just won't reach) and hit properties. Under the sharing tab, just check the box to allow that connection to be shared. Plug your Xbox into the ethernet port. 2. There are a few other ways to proceed at this point, and you're probably going to have try at least a couple of them to find one that'll work. You could bridge the two connections (dicey), or you could manually assign the ethernet port an IP address, detailed here (PDF). This Instructable relies on automagicalness to resolve the settings, and I have had that work in the past, though not when I was sorting through methods for this how to. All in all, expect to do some Googling and troubleshooting if you go the Windows route. Mac You'd think this would be easy, 'cause I heard somewhere that Macs just work, and internet sharing on Macs typically ain't hard, but there is a tiny bit of jujitsu involved here. This method, from Joystiq, is the most reliable one I used. 1. On your Mac, pop open Terminal, and type "ifconfig en0" (number zero, no quotes). A whole bunch of crap will pop up. Find where it says "inet 192.xxx.x.xxx" (it should be 192, anyway). Write that junk down. It will probably be 192.168.2.1, like mine. Also find out your router's IP address, which is most likely 192.168.1.1 (Linksys) or 192.168.0.1 (D-Link uses this), depending on your manufacturer. If you have Apple's Airport gear, the router will be at 10.0.1.1. 2. Then plug your Xbox 360 into your Mac, open up Sharing in Preferences. Turn on internet sharing, and share your Airport's internet connection with ethernet. 3. On the Xbox, flip to your network settings (under system settings), and enter the IP address you got from the terminal freaky deaky earlier but + 1, like 192.168.2.2 to my original 192.168.2.1. Subnet should be 255.255.255.0, and then set your gateway as the ifconfig number, 192.168.2.1. Under DNS (back one screen, then down), put in your router's actual address for both. Test your Xbox Live connection. Your NAT might suck, but you can get on Xbox Live. Hack Your Router This method is the least straightforward, and requires a little bit of work on your part. Essentially, you're buying a second router (a cheap one, for about $40) and installing custom software on it that turns it into a giant wireless antenna that's hooked up to your Xbox 360. There are tons of Linux custom firmwares for routers nowadays, with DD-WRT and Tomato being the most popular. Tomato is a bit more user friendly, but it works with far fewer routers than DD-WRT. DD-WRT works with dozens of different routers (click for the list). Whichever firmware you go with, the method for putting on your router will vary from device to device, with Buffalo routers being a notorious pain in the ass. Tomato includes instructions with the firmware download�but here are some of the details, and Lifehacker's complete guide to installing and using Tomato. DD-WRT is my preferred firmware. Here are the detailed install instructions, but with most Linksys routers, you can just drill into the router settings from the web address (192.168.1.1) and upload the DD-WRT firmware, directly, making it pretty easy. But some routers require different, exceptionally specific install methods. So check out the list before you run out to Best Buy or Circuit City. My preferred router for this because of its tininess and cheapness (under $40), was the Buffalo G-125, which required you to flash it over TFTP backdoor the DD-WRT firmware onto it during a brief window of time, like Luke dropping those bombs into the Death Star's vent shaft. It's a pain in the ass, but everything else about the Buffalo routers make it worth it. Unfortunately, you can't buy it in the States until the next month or so, so your cheapest bet is is Linksys's $40ish WRT54G, which unfortunately, has different install methods depending on the revision. The DD-WRT wiki is very good, so you shouldn't run into problems following it. Once you get either firmware installed, you're going to set your hacked router up as a wireless client. 1. You're going to need to go into the hacked router's settings. Set the hacked router to client mode. 2. These numbers are going to vary slightly based on your router, but you need to assign it an IP address�if your main router's IP address is 192.168.0.1, set your hacked router at 192.168.0.2 or 192.168.0.101 (a number that's in your main router's DHCP server range). Then make the gateway and DNS the same IP address as your main router. 3. When it reboots you're gonna have to re-login to whatever IP address your hacked router is. Do that, go back in, and give the hacked router the same SSID (name) as your main router (Linksys, gizrox, whatever you have it named). You can also configure wireless security at this point, though for me, it's always been kind of flaky, WEP in particular, so you might have to play around to see what works. 4. To test, try to get online using the hacked router as your internet connection, with all of your computer's IP settings left on automatic. If it works, plug the hacked router into your Xbox. If not, check out the DD-WRT wiki for more halpz. 4. On your Xbox, you can leave everything set to automatic�the hacked router does all the work. The hacked router method might take the longest, but at least you won't have a useless dongle when the Xbox 720 comes out, you'll have a full-featured router, and it's cheaper than the official dongle. Plus you'll have a feeling of accomplishment that will carry over to gaming, so you should kill a lot more people in Call of Duty.
  8. Bonjour, Je prévois installer un nouveau ventilateur dans ma xbox comme présenté dans ce tutoriel: http://forums.xbox-scene.com/index.php?showtopic=742840 La question que je me posais avant d'installer le ventilateur est: Dans quelle direction est-ce que le ventilateur doit souffler pour être le plus efficace? (tirer l'air à l'extérieur de la xbox ou souffler à l'intérieur) Merci --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hello, I plan to install a new fan in my xbox as shown in this tutorial: http://forums.xbox-scene.com/index.php?showtopic=742840 I just have a question before installing the fan: In which direction does the fan must blow to be most effective? (pull air out of the xbox or push air inside) thank you
  9. What are the steps necessary to install Xbox 1 Games onto an external HDD in order for FSD to properly load them? My current setup is a fresh install of FSD3. I have a few ISO of xbox1 games. So the steps from there are what I am requesting for the community.
  10. Routers & Port Forwarding Have you ever noticed that sometimes you can't join certain games on Xbox LIVE??? Have you noticed that in some games there are people that you can't hear or talk to?? If this is the case you probably don't have a fully 100% xbox live compatible router or you don't have your ports setup for optimal online gaming. Here are some notes and instructions to hopefully assist you people in at least working towards fixing up your setup and which may alleviate these issues. Network and Router Intro First things first - I'm assuming your setup looks something like this: Xbox -> Broadband Router -> (possibly a modem) -> Internet Your broadband router may have a built-in ADSL modem or you may be using a separate external modem (ADSL or Cable). You may also have one or more network hubs and/or switches - these shouldn't affect things for this discussion. If you are using a broadband router (with multiple wired and/or wireless ports) which does NAT for connection sharing (NB: This is typically the case with most if not all of these devices) and you have an external (separate) modem then I'm expecting that you are running your modem in Bridging (passthrough) mode and not Routing (NAT) mode - if this is not that case then you "may" want to try connecting your xbox directly to the modem instead. Now this guide is going to be using some potentially confusing acronyms and terms (like NAT, UDP, TCP, Port, UPnP, IP, DMZ, etc) - in most cases you don't actually need to know what these mean or what they really represent - most of the time you just need to find and select an option with that name in the routers administrative interface. Which brings us to another point - most (if not all) home broadband routers have some form of administrative interface (where you can set things up and change settings) - it is usually accessed via a web based (via a web browser) interface. To make changes to the router configuration you will need to know: - the web address for this admin interface (usually something like <!-- m -->http://192.168.100.1/<!-- m --> or something like that - more on this elsewhere) - the administrative account name (usually "admin" or something like that) - the password Use one of the Three Options below to configure your broadband router to make it more Xbox Live compatible. All of the Options below require you to log into the routers administrative interface (using a web browser) and make changes to its configuration. Options 2 and 3 also require you to know the IP Address of your Xbox (instructions for doing this are given after the three options). The second option also requires you to work out how to setup port forwarding rules in the router. The following web site details instructions (with pictures) (for a huge number of Routers) on how to both log into the web interface (giving the usual default address and username) and how to configure a port forwarding rule for each router. In most cases the example given is to setup a port forward to the PCs IP Address - you want to set it up to forward to the Xboxes IP Address instead. If your exact router is not listed then perhaps try choosing a similar one and use the example. <!-- m -->http://www.portforward.com/routers.htm<!-- m --> Three Basic Options for Setting up your Router Option 1: UPnP - the first thing to check is to see if your broadband router supports a feature called UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) and turn it on. You may also be able to install a newer firmware in your router (which you can usually obtain from your router manufacturers web site) which has the UPnP feature. However UPnP just may not be available for your router in which case try Option 2. Option 2: Port Forwarding - the second option you can try is to see if your router supports the setup of "port forwarding" rules and if so setup (three) port forwarding rules for the following three ports to the IP address of your Xbox: UDP 88 UDP 3074 and TCP 3074 (see <!-- m -->http://www.portforward.com/routers.htm<!-- m --> for more info on how to do this) Option 3: DMZ Host - the last option you can try is to see if your router supports specifying a DMZ (Exposed) Host and if so configure it so that the IP address of your Xbox is setup as the DMZ Host. Your Xboxes IP Address To setup any port forwarding or DMZ rules you need to determine the IP Address of the device you are going to forward these ports to (your xbox). Most people with a router will have it setup such that it is a DHCP server and all the devices you connect to your LAN will be DHCP clients - which will be automatically assigned an IP address (and other information) by the DHCP Server in your router. Most routers have a nice status web page which show you the currently connected devices (DHCP Clients Table, Attached Devices, LAN Status, etc) and their MAC addresses and IP Addresses - however how do you determine which one of these devices is the Xbox? The easiest way is to have only two devices active on your LAN (the PC you are using to administer the router with and the xbox). Have them both connected and turned on and then go to the routers connected devices web page and hopefully you should have only two devices listed in the table. One of them will be your PC and the other will be the Xbox. By a process of elimination if you determine your PC (Computers) IP Address the other one will be the Xbox. An alternative is to manually assign an IP Address (and Gateway and DNS server address) to your Xbox (using the Xbox Dashboard network settings) - you must assign an address from the same pool as the routers DHCP Server assigns (basically one which has the same first three numbers in the IP address as your PC (and the web admin interface address) has - e.g. 192.168.???. NB: Don't choose an address which is already in use on your home network. Your Computer's IP Address - Click the Start button. - Click Run button (XP ONLY) - In the text area type cmd. (A black screen should pop up on the screen.) - In the black screen type IPConfig. (Your computer's IP address should be listed next to IP Address. If you have more than one NIC card select the IP address that starts with 192.168.)
  11. The XeBuild team has released an update to their Xbox360 nand builder, XeBuild 1.04. Along with some minor bug fixed they have also added support for the Corona motherboard. There is no need to update your current nand images as the fixes are minor. xeBuild_1.04.zip 15574.zip
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