cjd166

Libxenon toolchain install?

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Hello,

I am trying to install the libxenon toolchain following the guide on free60 resulting in error. The build fails making gcc first pass in GCC/doc I have tried this on Ubuntu and debian... I have downgraded to texinfo 4.8 on debian hoping it would help but still fails with error while making GCC... I can upload log shortly but the error can be easily replicated by installing debian or Ubuntu and simply following the guide on free60..

Thanks

Cjd

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It has to do with using newer versions of GCC... i think you need 4.7 or older to actually compile the toolchain properly...

I created a VM image back when i was actively working on the project, it can be found here:  https://mega.nz/#!3k4UFayA!CDkEvw_vwntt2xdPvJTWsyKzi80dgj67WelkfPZadD4 the username/password is likely "libxenon", but it might be something else...

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Thank you so much. I will try with 4.7 but will most likely make use the VM image.... Thank you swizzy

Cjd

Great that it's ova as well!!!!

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compiled with no problems after installing an older version of gcc.. Thanks for the easy fix.... 

cjd

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Are there any current links to the fs libs??  I get 404 on github

cjd

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On 23/02/2017 at 2:48 PM, cjd166 said:

Are there any current links to the fs libs??  I get 404 on github

cjd

https://github.com/Free60Project they're available here on github

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can't login to my account

Debian GNU/Linux  7 XeLLCompiler tty1

Login incorrect

 please help me! 

Thanks

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Wow..... Linux hacking 101. lol. I am assuming you are running this in a virtual machine, but if not the process is basically the same.

 

So..... you will need to edit the /etc/shadow file. to do this you will need a livecd of some sort This is dumbed down a bit, but a little googling and you should figure it out.

This process requires root access, hince the livecd.

1.) boot off the live CD

2.)Mount the root partition of the virtual HDD, should be /dev/sdaX(Where X is the partition number

3.) create a new password hash "openssl passwd -1 

4.) copy the hash that is produced.

5.) replace the hash for root in /MountPoint/etc/shadow

should look something like this:

	root:$1$SI4dvHLr$lLh8jESjtJ0jrHJIQtQJz1:17243:0:::::
	

 

Fair warning, the example hash here is a blank password, and not an actual password I would use, sorry to those hackers out there who would try to use it to access my stuff.

6.) Then save and exit.

7.) Unmount the partition

8. reboot without live cd, and login with new password

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Or you can just tell grub to dump you into a recovery terminal... with that you can just use passwd instead of going the manual way :)

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13 hours ago, Swizzy said:

Or you can just tell grub to dump you into a recovery terminal... with that you can just use passwd instead of going the manual way :)

True, assuming grub is set up to allow you to access the recovery terminal. I actually remove that option from all of my builds, as I never use it, then I add a password, so people cant modify the kernel cmd line. And since I didnt set up that enviornment, I didnt know if there was a recovery console option, so my solution was more of a will work every time solution. ;) There are other ways to do that also, such as chroot, but I figured editing a txt file was easier then walking someone through the chroot process, and then having to reset the environment.... You get the idea. ;)

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The VM image i provided largely contain defaults for everything, security wasn't something i cared about when i made it as it was something i only used when working on libxenon stuff... and since it was a virtual machine very little damage could be done if somehow someone got into it while i had it running without me noticing...

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